Tag Archives: information literacy

ALL Forum PowerPoint Presentation

Uploaded recently in the Association of Laguna Librarians (ALL) blog are the keynote address & lecture note of the forum on “Basic Information Literacy for Teachers and Librarians” held at UPLB-College of Veterinary Medicine Lecture Hall, College, Los Baños, Laguna last May 22, 2008.

The keynote address was delivered by Prof. Madeline A. Suva entitled “Information Literacy : a Challenge to Librarians” (ppt, 42 slides) and she is an associate professor of the Department of Development Journalism, UPLB-College of Development Communication.

The main speaker of the half-day forum, Ms Mary Ann M. Ingua, College Librarian of UPLB-Main Library and concurrently the ALL President, delivered a presentation entitled “Information Literacy for Teachers, Librarians and Information Professionals” (ppt, 28 slides).

Click here to view the PowerPoint presentation*.

ALL was formally organized in 05 December 2006 and became the 3rd Provincial Chapter Member of the PLAI-STRLC.

*ppt cannot be downloaded but the transcript could be copied when viewed at Slideshare.

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Towards Information Literacy Indicators


(click image to download the pdf or here)

From Unesco

“UNESCO’s Information for All Programme (IFAP) releases a paper providing a basic conceptual framework for measuring information literacy. Entitled Towards information literacy indicators, the publication includes a definition of information literacy; a model that links information literacy with other adult competences, such as ICT skills; and a description of information literacy standards in education”. [emphasis supplied]


Previous blog posting about IL here.

Towards Information Literacy Indicators


(click image to download the pdf or here)

From Unesco

“UNESCO’s Information for All Programme (IFAP) releases a paper providing a basic conceptual framework for measuring information literacy. Entitled Towards information literacy indicators, the publication includes a definition of information literacy; a model that links information literacy with other adult competences, such as ICT skills; and a description of information literacy standards in education”. [emphasis supplied]


Previous blog posting about IL here.

IL Logo Contest

Last February 5, 2008, UNESCO and IFLA launched the Information Literacy Logo Contest via a Press Release that follows:

UNESCO and the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) invite everyone to propose an international Logo to identify the work on information literacy. The aim of creating this Logo is to make communication easier among those who carry out information literacy projects, their communities and societies in general.

The Logo will be available free of charge and promoted as an international symbol of information literacy. As adopted in the Alexandria Proclamation of 2005, at the High Level Colloquium on Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning, information literacy is defined as a mean to empower “people in all walks of life to seek, evaluate, use and create information effectively to achieve their personal, social, occupational and educational goals”. Information literacy is a “basic human right in a digital world and promotes social inclusion in all nations.” UNESCO and IFLA invite all institutions and organizations from different countries to participate in the Logo Contest design.

Guidelines for submission of nominations are available at: http://www.infolitglobal.info/. If you represent an association or an organization and wish to endorse, support or promote this initiative in your country, please, send an email to the project coordinator:

  • Misako Ito, UNESCO, or

  • Jesus Lau, IFLA
  • The actual invitation said:

    To: Information Literacy Professionals

    Librarians

    Graphic Designers

    Educators

    On behalf of UNESCO, IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) and its Information Literacy Section (InfoLit), we invite everyone to propose an international Logo to identify information literacy work. The aim of creating this Logo is to make communication easier between those who carry out information literacy projects, their communities, and society in general. The Logo will be available free of charge and promoted as an international symbol of information literacy. The term “information literacy” is defined as:

    To be information literate, a person must be able to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information. The information literate individuals are those who have learned how to learn” (ALA, 1998)

    IFLA and UNESCO invite all institutions and organizations from different countries to participate in the Logo contest design. If you represent an association or an organization and would like to endorse, support or promote this initiative in your country, please, send an email to the project coordinator.

    Understanding Information Literacy : a Primer

    Just published and ecopy available for download from Unesco:

    Horton, Forest W. 2008. Understanding information literacy : a primer. Paris : Unesco. 94 p.

    An easy-to-read, non-technical overview explaining what “information literacy” means, designed for busy public policy-makers, business executives, civil society administrators and practicing professionals.

    Another earlier published Unesco book on IL with ecopy available for download (pdf):

    Sayers, Richard. 2006. Principles of awareness-raising : information literacy, a case study. Bangkok : Unesco. 124 p.
    While previous blog posting about IL are here: HILT, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

    Handbook for Information Literacy Teaching

    Cardiff University just made available on the web the 2nd revision of the Handbook for Information Literacy Teaching (HILT) which was originally produced in 1995 and was first revised in 2005. Click here to view the e-copy.

    “The handbook was written to assist subject librarians, library managers and others with an IL role by equipping them with techniques to promote IL within schools, to prepare learning outcomes and to deliver and evaluate appropriate learning experiences.”

    “There are nine sections presented in a logical order beginning with the key issues of IL provision, with subsequent sections exploring the planning and delivery of teaching, and finally evaluation and student assessment. Each sections comprises a presentation of guidelines with references to supporting documents and examples of good practice”

    Table of Contents
    Preliminaries
    Section 1: Information Literacy – Key Issues
    Section 2: Library Orientation
    Section 3: Lesson Planning
    Section 4: Lesson Formats
    Section 5: Teaching Aids
    Section 6: Lesson Delivery
    Section 7: Evaluating your Teaching
    Section 8: Assessment
    Section 9: Instructor Training
    Supporting Documents



    “This is very much intended to be a work of reference, dipped into as the need arises, rather than read from cover to cover.”

    UPDATED as of 18 February 2008

    Clinch, P. and Jones-Evans, A. (2007) “The Cardiff Handbook for Information Literacy Teaching – a case study in sharing staff training materials” Journal of information literacy, 1 (3), http://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/JIL/article/view/ART-V1-I3-2007-2/29.

    Abstract
    Purpose: This article describes and discusses the principles behind the preparation by staff of the Information Services Directorate of Cardiff University of the Handbook for Information Literacy Teaching (HILT). The Handbook aims to equip staff with techniques to promote information literacy, to prepare learning outcomes and to deliver and evaluate appropriate learning experiences within teaching schools in the university. The 2006 edition of the Handbook, which runs to 130 A4 pages and is available to subject librarians in both paper and web format, has been revised in the light of both internal and external evaluations. A number of higher and further education establishments and the library of a government department have taken part in an external evaluation and the results of this are presented. The findings on the transferability of the Handbook to organisations outside Cardiff University are discussed and presented.

    Methodology/Approach: A largely chronological presentation of the development of the Handbook, with the results of the internal and external evaluations, each of which used a combination of questionnaires and focus group meetings.
    Findings: The Handbook has utility for staff within Cardiff University and was well regarded by external evaluation even though major adaptation would be required to make it applicable within other institutions. Consequently, its value within the higher and further education and Government sectors was limited to use as a reference tool rather than as a staff development resource. It is possible to speculate that the Handbook may be more readily repurposed for similar higher education institutions, although this was not specifically examined in the external evaluation.

    Practical implications: The results of the evaluation emphasises the different approaches to and levels of information literacy teaching in the higher and further education sectors. Tailored resources can not be easily transferred to other institutions without significant re-design or re-purposing of the Handbook for a wider audience.

    Originality/value of paper: The paper deals with a unique product and a unique method of evaluation. On the surface, the Handbook appears to be a transferable publication – the results of the evaluation indicate otherwise.

    Learning to Learn: Major Competencies to Help Young and Adults

    The Association of Laguna Librarians (ALL) formerly known as Laguna Librarians Association (LLA) is organizing a half-day forum entitled, “Learning to learn: major competencies to help young and adults” on February 29, 2008, Friday, at 8:00 am, at the University of the Philippines Los Baños Main Library, with Ms. Mary Ann Ingua of the UPLB Main Library as the resource speaker.

    Forum fee is PhP 100.00 per participant to cover snacks, certificates and handouts and an optional ALL membership fee of PhP 100.00 for those interested to join the Association.

    Furthermore, in the afternoon, there will be an on-the-spot logo making competition dubbed as Likha-Dunong” wherein artistically smart students from some Laguna schools will showcase their talents and skills.

    The concept of organizing LIKHA-DUNONG is rooted in the Association of Laguna Librarians’ noble advocacy to promote Information Literacy to the community it represents, particularly to the young generation of today. As information professionals, the Association commits itself to encourage every young learner to value this vital skill more than ever, in this age when the need for information that is properly obtained, assessed, and applied, is already considered a requisite for survival.

    LIKHA, which means “a creation” and DUNONG, that refers to karunungan or knowledge, stands to our aim to find out how the participants would interpret their understanding of information literacy after joining the forum. The desired output is to come up with an artwork, specifically a logo that would symbolize the significance of being an information-literate member of the society nowadays. Likha-Dunong is the Association’s first endeavor to promote awareness of this skill since it has chosen information literacy as its main area of interest this year.*

    Click here to download the invitation to the forum. (AGAnday)